[ A.i] GOOGLE GLASSES 2.0 ARE BACK, THIS TIME WITH ASSISTED REALITY. CHECK UPDATES ON GOOGLE’S ‘RIGHT TO BE FORGOTTEN’ CASE PRESENTLY IN TOP EU COURT.

[ A.i] GOOGLE GLASSES 2.0 ARE BACK, THIS TIME WITH ASSISTED REALITY. CHECK UPDATES ON GOOGLE’S ‘RIGHT TO BE FORGOTTEN’ CASE PRESENTLY IN TOP EU COURT.

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Thursday, 20 July 2017
GADGETS & GIZMOS

We all already know, if there is anything Google and other tech giants like apple and amazon are scared of, it is the impending Artificial intelligence (A.I) enterprise war.

The biggest and most recent headlines in tech  include the return of Google Glass, Amazon’s Spark service and an update to the Bluetooth standard that will allow the technology to work over mesh networks.

A long time ago, before Snapchat Spectacles and Microsoft HoloLens, there was Google Glass. Google’s bold vision of headsets wasn’t as futuristic as it seemed back in 2013 — it was more head-mounted display than augmented reality — and its design as a personal device put most people off.

Google Glass 2.0 is a hardware revamp of the Glass in a similar design. Now it’s being targeted as a wearable for business use, in the spirit of the Epson Moverio, HoloLens and Daqri. And in that context, it’s now more attractive..

 

Glass Enterprise Edition, as it’s being called, is only available via what it calls Glass Partners, companies that are making specific, customized versions for clients. Price is variable: “The cost can vary based on the software customization, customer support and training you need.”

Glass Partners include Augmedix (a “documentation automation platform” for health systems), Aira (assistance for the blind, which helped this runner race the Boston Marathon) and Brain Power (neuroscience-assisted tools for autism and traumatic brain injury).

DHL, GE, Sutter Health and AGCO have already been working with Glass Enterprise Edition, according to X Company, the tech incubator that’s a part of Google’s parent company Alphabet. GE airplane mechanics have engine manuals and blueprints in their line of sight; AGCO workers can get remote video support. 

 

Spec improvements include longer battery life, lighter weight, a faster processor, an improved 8-megapixel camera, a light to show when the Glass is recording, and better, more secure wireless connectivity. The Glass also works with prescription lenses.

 

Technically, the Glass isn’t positioning itself as an AR device. Instead, X Company considers the Glass to be “assisted reality,” not augmented reality.

 

As augmented reality moves into morephones in the near future, AR headsets — or assisted reality ones — no longer seem so farfetched. Whether or not people will want to wear smartglasses remains unclear, but for those that do, Glass is firmly staying in the enterprise race. And the funny thing is, this time it all seems incredibly, boringly normal.

In other news:

The European Union’s top court is about to decide whether or not Google is required to remove certain results from its iconic search engine. The crux of the matter is the so-called “right to be forgotten,” policy in Europe that lets people ask search engines to remove some results from queries of their own names.

What’s in question isn’t the policy itself — Google already complies with it — but how far-reaching those de-listings should be.The EU court will examine if Google has to remove results only in countries where the request was made, or beyond national borders. The referral to the EU’s top court came from France’s privacy regulator.The decision will set a precedent over how broadly national laws can be enforced internationally — a tricky situation when it comes to the internet.”Each country should be able to balance freedom of expression and privacy in the way that it chooses, not in the way that another country chooses,” a Google spokeswoman said in a statement. “We’re doing this because we want to ensure that people have access to content that is legal in their country. We look forward to making our case at the European Court of Justice.”

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