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OK! NOW LETS SET THE RECORD STRAIGHT ABOUT THE APPLE LOGO

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Wednesday, 07 January 2015
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Apple boasts one of the most recognizable logos of our
time, so it’s no surprise that it’s been sliced,
diced, examined and interpreted wrongly.The truth is, Apple’s famous apple is not a mythical symbol engineered with a hidden meaning.It is just a clear uncomplicated design that’s been carefully tweaked over time. Simply put “the apple logo is just-SIMPLE”!.”Apple has been
really smart about the way they have evolved the
logo,” said Peter Madden, founder and president of
Philadelphia-based brand consultants AgileCat. “It’s
simple, but it’s very hard to get to simple. Simple is
brilliant, and that can scare people he further said. Fortunately, simple didn’t scare Steve Jobs. The apple logo was born when Jobs decided that the
company’s original logo see image link here: www.edibleapple.com/2009/04/20/the-evolution-and-history-of-the-apple-logo/ (a woodcut by co-founder
Ronald Wayne depicting Sir Isaac Newton) was far too complex to be memorable. So he hired Palo Alto, Calif., designer Rob Janoff. The brief was four words: “Don’t make it cute.” For Apple, Janoff settled on … an apple. “It was a no-brainer,” he said in a 2009 interview . “You would
miss the mark if you didn’t show some kind of
apple.” Janoff said.

Below are the popular myths that had plagued the ever simple apple logo:

1) the bite represents the sin of knowledge
ravished by a carnal bite from Adam and Eve.(not true)

2) The rumor that the logo’s rainbow color bands were some sort of support for gay liberation (false)

3) The apple was actually a furtive acknowledgement to Legendary
code breaker Alan Turing, a brilliant
mathematician who, uncovered by Britain’s moral
police in 1954, killed himself by biting into an apple
he had laced with cyanide (absolutely false)

4) The bitten apple logo derived from an infuriated Steve Jobs biting into an apple placed on a conference table during a strategy and logo design meeting with his creative designers (absolutely fallacious).

Credits: Robert Klara via adweek

additional credits: google images

Edited and posted by: @djshyluckjimmy
instagram @jimmyadesanya

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